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Gene Changes in Breast Cancer Cells Pinpointed with New Computational Method

Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University, working with high-throughput data generated by breast cancer biologists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have devised a computational method to determine how gene networks are rewired as normal breast cells turn malignant and as they respond to potential cancer therapy agents.

This method for analyzing how genes interact with each other in laboratory-grown cells is described in a report published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.

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Scientists Discover Genetic Cause of Common Breast Tumors in Women

A multi-disciplinary team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, and Singapore General Hospital have made a seminal breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of fibroadenoma, one of the most common breast tumors diagnosed in women.

The team, led by Professors Teh Bin Tean, Patrick Tan, Tan Puay Hoon and Steve Rozen, used advanced DNA sequencing technologies to identify a critical gene called MED12 that was repeatedly disrupted in nearly 60% of fibroadenoma cases. Their findings have been published in the journal Nature Genetics.

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Study Identifies Genes Linked to Breast Cancer in East Asian Women

A new study of East Asian women has identified three genetic changes linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. The research, led by Vanderbilt University investigators, was published in the journal Nature Genetics.

While breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies among women worldwide, most studies of the genetic risk factors for the disease have focused on women of European ancestry.

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Researchers Identify Possible Target for Immunotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

Yale Cancer Center researchers used a new molecular analysis tool to accurately detect the level of an important target for immunotherapy in early-stage breast cancers. The diagnostic test, using RNAScope, measures the amount of PD-L1 (programmed death ligand 1) mRNA in routine formalin-fixed cancer tissues and is devoid of many of the technical issues that plague antibody-based detection methods that have yielded conflicting results in the past.

PD-L1 is the target of several novel immune stimulatory therapies in clinical trials. Their findings were published in the Journal of Clinical Cancer Research.

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